Songwriters Hall of Fame

Eddie Holland gained worldwide fame as a Motown Record’s songwriter and music publisher along with his brother Brian. Eddie was also a recording artist who performed the chart-topping hit “Jamie” in the early 1960s. During the same time he penned a string of hits for some of the biggest names in...
Brian Holland and his brother Eddie are among the most popular songwriting teams in the history of popular music! For decades they have created the words and music to Motown’s classic sound that has forever changed the way people dance, fall in love and celebrate life. The key to their success as...
Wayland Holyfield wrote several popular songs for both popular and country artists during a career that began singing in church as a child out in Conway County, Arkansas.  He wrote such classics as “Could I Have This Dance”, “Some Broken Hearts Never Mend”,“Till The Rivers All Run Dry” and one of...
Leon Huff cut his teeth in the recording studios as a session player in the 1950s before meeting Kenneth Gamble.  The two became one of the most prolific and successful songwriting and record producing teams in the music industry.  They not only created the Philly Sound, they set standards and...
Jerry Leiber was one half of Leiber and Stoller, one of the most influential and successful songwriting teams of the 1950s R&B movement. They played a critical role in the early days of Rock and Roll penning songs for rocks biggest and earliest stars such as Elvis Presley, the Drifters, the...
Johnny Mandel is the arranger and composer who may be best known for writing the theme to the movie and television series M*A*S*H*. As a songwriter he spent several years in the 1940s and 50s plugging his songs in the Brill Building in New York, the then hub for music publishing. He spent years...
Keith Mardak provided great detail of the history of Hal Leonard Publishing, especially the stories of the company's founder, who passed away years ago, before he could be interviewed for this program. Without Keith's insight, the early days of this important music publisher may have been lost....
Hugh Martin was a great American songwriter who teamed with Ralph Blane at the end of the golden age of Tin Pan Alley to give us such classics as “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” “The Trolley Song” and “The Girl Next Door.” As a tunesmith, Hugh worked on Broadway, for the movies, and as...
Don McLean walked into the House of Music in New Rochelle, New York as a kid dreaming of owning a Martin Guitar.  When he finally owned one, that instrument assisted him in writing several hit songs.  The rock and roll anthem "American Pie" and "Vincent" were both written on his Martin, as were...
Mary Jo Mennella is the president and founder of Music Asset Management, Inc. She studied trumpet in college and landed her first job in the industry working at ASCAP in New York, then Los Angeles. While with ASCAP, she worked on a number of projects including the first Pop Music Awards. Mary Jo...

Pages