Library - In Memoriam

Remembering oral history interviewees who have passed away.

Kevin Becka started playing guitar at 11 years old and aspired to become a famous guitar player.

Russell Thomas was a band director for over 34 years.  During his teaching years he often felt frustrated that simple repairs would take weeks and often delay concerts or rehearsals.  A local music store provided him an opportunity to learn simple repairs, which led to a passion

Charles Walter was a pillar in the piano business for nearly 60 years. He was hired by the C.G. Conn Company to work in the piano design department back in 1964. While there he worked under the legendary Dr. Earle Kent, the Director of Research and Engineering.

Manny Lopez was known around the world as the King of the Cha Cha Cha for his 1950s band and hit records dedicated to the dance craze, but Manny’s musical career was far more than just the Cha Cha.

Preston Epps was the percussionist who had a top 20 hit recording in 1959 entitled "Bongo Rock."  The success of the song led to additional recordings and concert tours that forever tied his name with the bongos!  His fascinating career in music included gigs with Count Basie, Be

Gary DeShazo began his musical career as a Texas bandmaster and then worked with James Caldwell, the founder of Caldwell Music. With a great understanding of the educators’ needs, Gary soon developed lasting relationships with band directors over the entire state and beyond.

Johnny Eberle was passionate about sound recordings ever since he was a small child.  Developing a love of audio engineering and it’s rich history, John became an expert and a well known mastering engineer.

Don Mozingo was a teacher in a small schoolhouse for over 20 years and among the topics he taught was music.  His love and passion for music can be traced to his parents and, as a child, Don began teaching himself to play every musical instrument.  While teaching, he began repair

Harry Rosenbloom was the founder of Medley Music and one of the true pioneers of import relations with the Japanese beginning in the late 1950s.

Morris Diamond sat down with us for his NAMM Oral History interview at the age of 97 and recalled his career in music which started when he was 15 years old.

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