Library - In Memoriam

Remembering oral history interviewees who have passed away.

Vincent McBryde picked up the saxophone at the age of 5 and played in bands throughout high school and into college, where he studied music with the hopes of becoming a band director. After a year of teaching he fell into the music products industry where he has since become a leader and visionary. 

Jane Smisor Bastien together with her husband. James Bastien., wrote the best-selling method-book, Bastien Piano Methods, enjoyed by millions of students and teachers worldwide. The series of books, all published by the Neil A.

Bob Giacoletti and his wife Eleanor opened a small music school in 1978 that soon took on a line of instruments and accessories to become a full line retail store. The store moved to downtown Carlsbad, California in 1982.

Horst Teller was the son of Oskar Teller, who formed a small workshop in 1929 in Schonbach to make musical instruments. After World War II, the company was rebuilt in Bubenreuth in 1949 and soon Oskar was joined in his shop by his son Horst.

Sally Schiff and her husband Mel moved from New York to Florida where they decided to open their own music retail business.  All County Music in Tamarac, Florida first opened in 1976 with a strong focus on band and orchestra music and repair.  Sally ran the store while Mel went o

Nokie Edwards was an original member of the Ventures, a rock group of the 1960’s that helped popularize instrumental recordings.

Bud Ross made his first amplifier for his own band in 1958 to save a little money. Within 5 years he had established Kustom Amps, a leader in product design and innovations.

Joyce Shelven was a factory worker for the Gibson Guitar Company when it was located in Kalamazoon, Michigan.  She was hired in 1947 just after the war and began working in the sanding department.

David Leed was born in the United Kingdom where he was hired by Boosey & Hawkes, which sent him to South Africa. While there, David became the General Manager for the Hammond Organ Company, which had a factory for Hammond-- in fact the fourth largest operation for the company in the world.

Bob Bull held many positions throughout the music products industry over his long career. However, he is perhaps best known as the president of the Steinway & Sons piano company during the early 1970s. At the time, Steinway was owned by CBS Musical Instruments.

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