Oral History -

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 Eleanor Anderson helped establish Woodbury Music Company with her late husband, Leroy Anderson.  The company is managed by their three children (Kurt, Rolf and Jane) with a third generation very active in music as well.  As composer and arranger, Leroy Anderson published popular classical music that helped create a whole new musical genre during the late 1940s and 1950s.  The

 Takehiko Akaboshi, the legendary Japanese music therapist and founder of the world renowned Japan Music Volunteer Association, began his career as a popular singer who recorded traditional and new folk songs as early as the 1950s.  While singing around the country he began seeing the benefits of music on the ill and in 1972 created “ryouiku ongaku” or therapeutic music program

Tony Acosta had a dream to make the world’s finest classical guitar strings.  He began working nights to perfect his product and build relationships within the industry and slowly gathered the needed equipment.

 Ken Achard played such an important part of the industry that he was asked to write a book.  The book entitled “The Peavey Revolution” was released in 2005 and covers Ken’s long association with the innovative company and its founder.  Ken met Hartley Peavey in 1972, who entrusted Ken to open up the UK operations of the Peavey Company.  The task did not come without challenges, but as Ken put it, “It was a great opportunity to be a part of something big. 

 David Abell formed his piano retail store in Beverly Hills back in the late 1950s.  Since that time he has established one of the finest reputations in our industry.  Noted musicians, industry leaders and movie stars alike have boasted of his quality of service and the fact that most of his deals have been based on a handshake.  David, however, is equally proud of the regular

Yoshiharu Abe is known as the father of personal multi-track recording in the audio engineering field.  He was one of the five founders of TEAC in 1957 and went on to become one of the company’s most important product designers.  Abe-san designed several landmark products over his long career including the 80-8 and the Portastudio series.  He later worked for Fostex and was a key player in the teams that created the B-13 and X-15.  Beginning in 1948 he also began writing extensively

 Sammy Ash was named after his grandfather, the founder of the Sam Ash Music Company in New York City.  Like his grandfather, Sammy has a deep passion and understanding of the music business and although both men faced different challenges in different eras, they both felt customer service was the highest priority.  Sammy has played a vital role in the company’s expansion.  He

 Scott Anderson was among the renowned sales representatives at Wurlitzer during the iconic company’s heyday.  When Wurlitzer “meant music to millions” (to use their famous slogan) Scott had established long-lasting relationships with many of the top selling dealers for the company.  1954 was the first of 34 years with the company and since that time Scott remains one of the most respected and known reps in the industry.  In 2003, Scott teamed with several other former Wurlitzer employees

Edward Garbett was the founder of the Progressive Music store in McKeesport Pennsylvania in the years following World War II.  He worked for Gretsch as Educational Director and a decade later was hired by Yamaha and oversaw the company’s growing school band programs throughout the 1960s and 70s.  One of his first employees at Progressive Music was the instrument repairman Willi

Jason How is the CEO and Chairman of Rotosound, the British string company his father formed in 1958.  James How was an innovative toolmaker who designed equipment that could produce various guitar string gauges in high numbers while retaining consistency.  Jason played a key role in the company’s expansion in market size and product line as well as in modernizing the company’s computer

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