Trade

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In a time of expanding global trade, NAMM monitors and advocates for trade policies and regulations that affect NAMM members who import and export musical products.  Please check here often for updates and new resources.

NAMM Joins 661 U.S. Companies and Associations to Urge Administration to Avoid Tariff Escalation, Reach Resolution with China

UPDATE: June, 2019 - Tariffs Hurt the Heartland, the national campaign against tariffs supported by more than 150 trade associations representing retail, tech, manufacturing and agriculture, sent a letter signed by 661 American companies and associations urging the administration to avoid additional tariffs and reach a resolution with China. The letter comes as the Office of the United States Trade Representative is set to begin hearings considering 25 percent tariffs on $300 billion in goods, 60 percent of which are consumer products. 520 companies signed the letter, including some of the nation’s most recognizable brands, and 141 trade associations at the national and state level. Read the full story below..

 

    NAMM's Letter to Ambassador Robert Lighthizer, United States Trade Representative

    UPDATE: June 14, 2019 - NAMM highlights the negative impact of proposed tariffs on our industry, US consumers, and the short and long-term implications for music education.  Read the full letter here...

     

    NAMM Supports Free Trade

    On behalf of 10,400 global members, NAMM believes that a strong and vibrant music and pro audio products and event technology industry is important to the educational and cultural vitality, as well as economic prosperity, of all countries. As a trade association, NAMM will continue in our efforts to proactively engage elected officials to keep the lines of dialogue and trade open and urge U.S. and world leaders to reaffirm a commitment to such.

    Ongoing updates and resources will continue to be posted to this page. Resources below include policy updates from the U.S. Trade Representative, The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and The National Retail Federation.

    • June 6 Tariff Webinar Recording and Resources

      Tariff Webinar Recording

      “411” On Submitting Comments, Requesting Exemptions and Registering to Testify.

      June 6, 2019: NAMM's conference call/webinar to review the current status and state of play of Chinese import tariffs with a timeline and direction on how to submit comments, request exemptions and register to testify at public hearings has been recorded for your review here. We received many more questions than we were able to address during our 60-minute webinar and are compiling a comprehensive FAQ document to be posted here in the next few days.

      As mentioned in our webinar:

      Timelines For Action

      To submit a comment to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative:

      1. As soon as possible (don’t wait until the deadline) visit www.regulations.gov (June 10, 2019 is the deadline for submitting a request to testify in Washington D.C. / June 17, 2019 is the deadline for submitting written comments)
      2. Enter Docket Number USTR-2019-0004 and click 'Search'
      3. Find a reference to this notice and click on the link titled ‘Comment Now!’
      4. Although you may submit comments through the web-based text box, USTR prefers that comments be submitted by attachment. You may submit in Microsoft Word (.doc) or searchable Adobe Acrobat (.pdf)
      5. Please reference specific tariff subheadings—in this case, Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HTS) category 9200 merchandise (musical instruments and related accessories)
      6. Please send a copy of your comment or your decision to withhold comments, to MaryL@namm.org

      Requirements for Written Comments

      Comments should set forth arguments addressing USTR key issues for exemptions:

      • The product is available only from China or predominantly from China or other foreign countries (percentage of foreign-made vs. domestic)
      • Tariffs on these specific goods would cause “disproportionate economic harm to U.S. interests, including small – or medium-size businesses and consumers”

      Additional arguments for exemptions:

      • Music education programs in K-12 schools nationwide and the musical life of every family would suffer from a proposed 25% tariff on imported musical instruments and equipment from China
      • With new tariffs, students/families in urban and rural communities would have greater difficulty purchasing or renting instruments and equipment; school districts, faced with greater costs, could shrink or even eliminate music education programs
      • Many affordable beginner instruments are made in China and young students quickly outgrow their instruments; young violinists will go through as many as four different sizes of violin by the time they get to high school
      • Musical instruments are a discrete consumer product with high inherent commercial/retail value: a 25% tariff would decrease access and musical opportunities
      • Tariffs on musical instruments and the imposition of greater costs to consumers would impact the musical and cultural life of all communities in the U.S.

      Resources:

       

    • Update: June, 2019 - NAMM joins 661 businesses and organizations in tariff letter to President Trump

      661 U.S. Companies and Associations Urge Administration to Avoid Tariff Escalation, Reach Resolution with China

      WASHINGTON — Tariffs Hurt the Heartland, the national campaign against tariffs supported by more than 150 trade associations representing retail, tech, manufacturing and agriculture, today sent a letter signed by 661 American companies and associations urging the administration to avoid additional tariffs and reach a resolution with China. The letter comes as the Office of the United States Trade Representative is set to begin hearings considering 25 percent tariffs on $300 billion in goods, 60 percent of which are consumer products. 520 companies signed the letter, including some of the nation’s most recognizable brands, and 141 trade associations at the national and state level.

       

      “We remain concerned about the escalation of tit-for-tat tariffs," the letter states. “We know firsthand that the additional tariffs will have a significant, negative and long-term impact on American businesses, farmers, families and the U.S. economy. Broadly applied tariffs are not an effective tool to change China’s unfair trade practices. Tariffs are taxes paid directly by U.S. companies, including those listed below - not China.”

       

      "We urge your administration to get back to the negotiating table while working with our allies to develop global, enforceable solutions. An escalated trade war is not in the country’s best interest, and both sides will lose,” the companies and associations added.

       

      Tariffs Hurt the Heartland recently released estimates prepared by Trade Partnership Worldwide that showed that imposing new tariffs on an additional $300 billion in goods (combined with the impacted of previously implemented tariffs and retaliation) would result in the loss of more than 2 million U.S. jobs, add more than $2,000 in costs for the average American family of four and reduce the value of U.S. GDP by 1.0 percent.

       

      Below is the full text of the letter. Read a copy online and the list of signers here:

       

      June 13, 2019

      President Donald J. Trump

      The White House

      1600 Pennsylvania Avenue

      Washington, DC 20500

       

      Dear Mr. President,

       

      On behalf of the undersigned companies below and the millions of workers we employ, we are writing regarding the ongoing trade dispute between the U.S. and China. We agree that our trading partners must abide by global trade rules, and we support the administration’s efforts to address unfair trading practices, including intellectual property violations, forced technology transfer and more. We encourage the administration to negotiate a strong deal with China that addresses longstanding structural issues, improves U.S. global competitiveness and eliminates tariffs. We believe this goal can be achieved without taxing Americans.

       

      We remain concerned about the escalation of tit-for-tat tariffs. We know firsthand that the additional tariffs will have a significant, negative and long-term impact on American businesses, farmers, families and the U.S. economy. Broadly applied tariffs are not an effective tool to change China’s unfair trade practices. Tariffs are taxes paid directly by U.S. companies, including those listed below— not China. According to Trade Partnership Worldwide LLC, 25 percent tariffs on an additional $300 billion in imports (combined with the impact of already implemented tariffs and retaliation) would result in the loss of more than 2 million U.S. jobs, add more than $2,000 in costs for the average American family of four and reduce the value of U.S. GDP by 1.0 percent. Furthermore, we have seen repeatedly that tariff increases and uncertainty around these trade negotiations have created turmoil in the markets, threatening our historic economic growth.

       

      Mr. President, we support your efforts to hold our trading partners accountable, level the playing field for American businesses and forge enforceable trade agreements. We urge your administration to get back to the negotiating table while working with our allies to develop global, enforceable solutions. An escalated trade war is not in the country’s best interest, and both sides will lose. We are counting on you to force a positive resolution that removes the current tariffs, fosters American competitiveness, grows our economy and protects our workers and customers.

       

      Sincerely,

       

      CC: Ambassador Robert Lighthizer, United States Trade Representative

      Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Department of the Treasury

      Secretary Wilbur Ross, Department of Commerce

      Secretary Sonny Perdue, Department of Agriculture

      Director Larry Kudlow, National Economic Council

       

      CONTACT:

      Matt McAlvanah

      (Matt@TariffsHurt.com)

      Or

      Melanie Lehnhardt

      (Melanie@TariffsHurt.com)

       

    • Update: May, 2019 - Tariff List # 4 Inclusion of Musical Instruments

      Chinese Trade Tariff Updates

      Tariff List #4 - Inclusion of Musical Instruments

      May 13, 2019: USTR has posted the draft Federal Register notice announcing the proposed HTS lines and the process for the proposed List 4 China 301 tariffs. The proposed 25% tariffs cover approximately $300 billion worth of imports from China. This includes just about everything that isn’t already subject to the additional 301 tariffs such as apparel, footwear, toys, consumer electronics and musical instruments.  Note: the list includes everything in HTS category 9200 (musical instruments and related accessories) Link to the list here.  

      USTR will hold a public hearing on June 17 on the proposed List 4 tariffs. All requests to testify must be submitted by June 10. Final comments must be submitted seven days after the final hearing date. Considering the List 3 tariffs ($200 billion) was six days long, this hearing process may go longer. President Trump plans to meet with President Xi during the G-20 Summit at the end of June. It is unlikely that a final decision on the List 4 tariffs will be made before that meeting.

      Questions/Comments: For questions about this proposed action, to submit public comment, or to request to testify at the June 17 public hearing, contact USTR Assistant General Counsels Arthur Tsao or Megan Grimball, or Director of Industrial Goods Justin Hoffmann at USTR (202) 395–5725. For questions on customs classification, contact traderemedy@cbp.dhs.gov.

      Notice of Modification of Section 301 Action

      May 10, 2019

      The United States Trade Representative's office has published an official notice implementing President Trump's announced plan to increase tariffs on some $200 billion worth of Chinese imports from 10% to 25%, effective at 12:01 a.m. on May 10.  While musical instruments are not directly affected by this increase, the list of affected products includes musical instrument cases, certain stands used for guitars and other musical instruments and some circuit board components of electronic instruments. Note: Products which left China prior to May 10 must arrive into the United States no later than June 1 to avoid the 25% tariff.

      Comments: For NAMM members wishing to express concern, please see the option to participate in the National Retail Federation’s “call to action” at the link here.

    • Update: September, 2018 - Chinese Import Tariffs

      Update: September 17, 2018

      The Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) released today, a list of approximately $200 billion worth of Chinese imports that will be subject to additional tariffs. In accordance with the direction of President Trump, the additional tariffs will be effective starting September 24, 2018, and initially will be in the amount of 10 percent. Starting January 1, 2019, the level of the additional tariffs will increase to 25 percent. In response to the USTR's action, China retaliated with its own increased tariffs, also effective September 24, 2018, on a list of products covering $60 billion in U.S. exports, at additional duty rates of 5% to 10%. This adds to China's retaliatory tariffs already in place on approximately $50 billion in U.S. exports. Currently, HTS (Harmonized Tariff Schedule) Chapter 92 (Musical Instruments) and HTS Chapter 49 (Printed Music, Music Books, Sheet Music) are not listed; however, some products and component parts within HTS Chapter 85 (Electrical Machinery and Equipment and Parts Thereof) are listed.

      Find out if your products or component parts are on the current list:

      Step 1: Lookup your product/component HTS Code here (U.S. International Trade Commission HTS Search)

      Step 2: Cross-reference your HTS Code on the final tariff list here (USTR.gov as of Sept.17, 2018)

    • Update: Sept. 2018 - China Retaliates with Tariffs on $60 Billion of U.S. Goods

      China Retaliates with Tariffs on $60B of U.S. Goods
      More than 5,000 types of goods listed by HS code face tariffs from 5 to 10 percent

      By Taylor Miller Thomas, POLITICO Pro DataPoint

      Following President Donald Trump’s Sept. 17 announcement that the U.S. would set tariffs on an additional $200 billion of Chinese goods, the Chinese government announced it would set tariffs of 5 percent or 10 percent on roughly $60 billion worth of U.S. exports to the country. The goods targeted by the Chinese government are the same it threatened tariffs on earlier in 2018. At that time, the Chinese Ministry of Commerce threatened tariffs as high as 25 percent on some of these goods.

      The U.S. government is planning to set tariffs at 10 percent on the latest set of Chinese goods but will raise that rate to 25 percent in 2019. The Chinse tariffs may also be increased at a later date, to coincide with the U.S. tariff rate hike. The latest tariffs from both countries go into effect on Sept. 24

      View Datapoint Graph Here

      Sources: Chinese Ministry of Commerce, USA Trade database, U.S. Census Bureau, USITC, Harmonized Tariff Schedule China will set tariffs based on the eight-digit HS code level.

      Disclaimer: The data in the graph reflects U.S. exports at the six-digit level, the closest available, and may not completely reflect the value of goods facing tariffs.

    • Update: Sept. 2018 - USTR Finalizes Tariffs on $200 Billion of Chinese Imports

      USTR Finalizes Tariffs on $200 Billion of Chinese Imports in Response to China’s Unfair Trade Practices

      Posted by the Office of the United States Trade Representative on 9/18/18

      Washington, DC – As part of the United States’ continuing response to China’s theft of American intellectual property and forced transfer of American technology, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) today released a list of approximately $200 billion worth of Chinese imports that will be subject to additional tariffs. In accordance with the direction of President Trump, the additional tariffs will be effective starting September 24, 2018, and initially will be in the amount of 10 percent. Starting January 1, 2019, the level of the additional tariffs will increase to 25 percent.

      The list contains 5,745 full or partial lines of the original 6,031 tariff lines that were on a proposed list of Chinese imports announced on July 10, 2018. Changes to the proposed list were made after USTR and the interagency Section 301 Committee sought and received comments over a six-week period and testimony during a six-day public hearing in August. USTR engaged in a thorough process to rigorously examine the comments and testimony and, as a result, determined to fully or partially remove 297 tariff lines from the original proposed list. Included among the products removed from the proposed list are certain consumer electronics products such as smart watches and Bluetooth devices; certain chemical inputs for manufactured goods, textiles and agriculture; certain health and safety products such as bicycle helmets, and child safety furniture such as car seats and playpens.

       

       

    • Update: Aug. 2018 - China Sets Tariffs on $16B in U.S. Goods

      Aug. 2018

      Source: Politico Pro Datapoint

      On Aug. 23, the U.S. and China each set tariffs on $16 billion of each other’s goods. China announced and imposed these tariffs after the U.S.  announced its own tariffs. This is the second time China has followed U.S. actions in setting tariffs.

      Texas, California and South Carolina led states by the total value of these goods that were exported to China in 2017. Washington, Illinois and Pennsylvania will see tariffs on more than $400 million in exports to China — and are facing key midterm races in November

      U.S. exports to China hit by Aug. 23 tariffs, by state Infographic 

    • Update: Aug. 2018 - USTR Finalizes Second Portion of Tariffs on Chinese Products

      USTR Finalizes Second Portion of Tariffs on Chinese Products

      Posted by the Office of the United States Trade Representative on 8/7/18

      The Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) today released a list of approximately $16 billion worth of imports from China that will be subject to a 25 percent additional tariff as part of the U.S. response to China’s unfair trade practices related to the forced transfer of American technology and intellectual property. This second portion of additional tariffs under Section 301 follows the first portion of tariffs on approximately $34 billion of imports from China, which went into effect on July 6.

      The list contains 279 of the original 284 tariff lines that were on a proposed list announced on June 15. Changes to the proposed list were made after USTR and the interagency Section 301 Committee sought and received written comments and testimony during a two-day public hearing last month. Customs and Border Protection will begin to collect the additional duties on the Chinese imports on August 23.

      In March 2018, USTR released the findings of its exhaustive Section 301 investigation that found China’s acts, policies and practices related to technology transfer, intellectual property and innovation are unreasonable and discriminatory and burden U.S. commerce.

      Specifically, the Section 301 investigation revealed:

      • China uses joint venture requirements, foreign investment restrictions, and administrative review and licensing processes to require or pressure technology transfer from U.S. companies.
      • China deprives U.S. companies of the ability to set market-based terms in licensing and other technology-related negotiations.
      • China directs and unfairly facilitates the systematic investment in, and acquisition of, U.S. companies and assets to generate large-scale technology transfer.
      • China conducts and supports cyber intrusions into U.S. commercial computer networks to gain unauthorized access to commercially valuable business information.
         

      A formal notice of the $16 billion tariff action will be published shortly in the Federal Register. NOTE: As in the case of the first portion of additional tariffs, the notice will announce a process by which interested persons may request the exclusion of particular products covered by a tariff line subject to the additional duties.

    • U.S Chamber of Commerce Resources

      The U.S. Chamber of Commerce (USCC) is the world’s largest business organization representing the interests of more than 3 million businesses of all sizes, sectors, and regions. USCC members range from mom-and-pop shops and local chambers to leading industry associations and large corporations. 

      Trade Tariff Resources 

    • National Retail Federation Resources

      The National Retail Federation is the world’s largest retail trade association. Based in Washington, D.C., NRF represents discount and department stores, home goods and specialty stores, Main Street merchants, grocers, wholesalers, chain restaurants and internet retailers from the United States and more than 45 countries. 

      Trade Tariff Updates

       

       

       

    • Call To Action - NRF's Letter Template Tool

      Take 2 minutes to let your representatives know that you have concerns with the proposed tariffs on products, materials and component parts from China. 

      Link to Template Tool

    • Tracking Tariffs on U.S. Goods

      Tracking Tariffs on US Goods

      August 15, 2018.  By Taylor Miller Thomas, Politico Datapoint 

      Multiple countries have set tariffs on US goods in the fallout after president Donald Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs. China set the earliest tariffs, on April 2, in the midst of a series of trade threats exchanged with the U.S. Other countries set tariffs as they were affected by the US tariffs, including Canada, the EU, and Mexico, which announced tariffs on the US after the steel and aluminum tariffs went into effect on their exports on May 31.  All told, more than $70 million in US exports are affected by these retaliatory tariffs. View this infographic to learn more. 

    • Forms and Instructions for Submitting Requests for Product Exclusions

      Forms and Instructions for submitting requests for product exclusions:

      Source: www.ustr.gov 

    • Instructions for Submitting Public Comments

      Instructions for submitting Public Comments

      • Link here to display the Comment form.
      • Enter your comments, attach files (up to 10MB each), as well as your personal information when applicable. Complete all the required fields.
      • Tips for submitting effective comments
      • Please note that information entered on the web form may be viewable publicly. These fields are identified by the globe icon.
      • Once you reach the "Your Preview" screen, the information that will be viewable publicly is displayed directly on the form under the section titled: "This information will appear on Regulations.gov."
      • To complete your comment, you must first agree to the disclaimer and check the box. This will enable the "Submit Comment" button.
      • Upon completion, you will receive a Comment Tracking Number for your comment.

      Source: www.regulations.gov