Trade

In a time of expanding global trade, NAMM monitors and advocates for trade policies and regulations that affect NAMM members who import and export musical products.  Please check here often for updates and new resources.

NAMM Supports Free Trade

On behalf of 10,400 global members, NAMM believes that a strong and vibrant music and pro audio products and event technology industry is important to the educational and cultural vitality, as well as economic prosperity, in all countries. As a trade association, NAMM will continue in our efforts to proactively engage elected officials to keep the lines of dialogue—and trade—open, and urge U.S. and world leaders to reaffirm a commitment to such.

In parallel with the organization’s ongoing dialogue with officials, all NAMM members are encouraged to let your representatives know your concerns with the proposed tariffs on products, materials and component parts from China. The National Retail Federation has provided a letter template tool which can be used to email the Office of the President, and your Congressional representatives. Access it here.

Update: September 17, 2018 – The Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) released today, a list of approximately $200 billion worth of Chinese imports that will be subject to additional tariffs.  In accordance with the direction of President Trump, the additional tariffs will be effective starting September 24, 2018, and initially will be in the amount of 10 percent.  Starting January 1, 2019, the level of the additional tariffs will increase to 25 percent. In response to the USTR's action, China retaliated with its own increased tariffs, also effective September 24, 2018, on a list of products covering $60 billion in U.S. exports, at additional duty rates of 5% to 10%. This adds to China's retaliatory tariffs already in place on approximately $50 billion in U.S. exports. Currently, HTS (Harmonized Tariff Schedule) Chapter 92 (Musical Instruments) and HTS Chapter 49 (Printed Music, Music Books, Sheet Music) are not listed; however, some products and component parts within HTS Chapter 85 (Electrical Machinery and Equipment and Parts Thereof) are listed.

Find out if your products or component parts are on the current list:

Step 1: Lookup your product/component HTS Code here (U.S. International Trade Commission HTS Search)

Step 2: Cross-reference your HTS Code on the final tariff list here (USTR.gov as of Sept.17, 2018)

Ongoing updates and resources will continue to be posted to this page. Resources below include policy updates from the U.S. Trade Representative, The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and The National Retail Federation.

 

  • Update Sept. 2018: China Retaliates with Tariffs on $60 Billion of U.S. Goods

    China Retaliates with Tariffs on $60B of U.S. Goods
    More than 5,000 types of goods listed by HS code face tariffs from 5 to 10 percent

    By Taylor Miller Thomas, POLITICO Pro DataPoint

    Following President Donald Trump’s Sept. 17 announcement that the U.S. would set tariffs on an additional $200 billion of Chinese goods, the Chinese government announced it would set tariffs of 5 percent or 10 percent on roughly $60 billion worth of U.S. exports to the country. The goods targeted by the Chinese government are the same it threatened tariffs on earlier in 2018. At that time, the Chinese Ministry of Commerce threatened tariffs as high as 25 percent on some of these goods.

    The U.S. government is planning to set tariffs at 10 percent on the latest set of Chinese goods but will raise that rate to 25 percent in 2019. The Chinse tariffs may also be increased at a later date, to coincide with the U.S. tariff rate hike. The latest tariffs from both countries go into effect on Sept. 24

    View Datapoint Graph Here

    Sources: Chinese Ministry of Commerce, USA Trade database, U.S. Census Bureau, USITC, Harmonized Tariff Schedule China will set tariffs based on the eight-digit HS code level.

    Disclaimer: The data in the graph reflects U.S. exports at the six-digit level, the closest available, and may not completely reflect the value of goods facing tariffs.

  • Update Sept. 2018: USTR Finalizes Tariffs on $200 Billion of Chinese Imports

    USTR Finalizes Tariffs on $200 Billion of Chinese Imports in Response to China’s Unfair Trade Practices

    Posted by the Office of the United States Trade Representative on 9/18/18

    Washington, DC – As part of the United States’ continuing response to China’s theft of American intellectual property and forced transfer of American technology, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) today released a list of approximately $200 billion worth of Chinese imports that will be subject to additional tariffs. In accordance with the direction of President Trump, the additional tariffs will be effective starting September 24, 2018, and initially will be in the amount of 10 percent. Starting January 1, 2019, the level of the additional tariffs will increase to 25 percent.

    The list contains 5,745 full or partial lines of the original 6,031 tariff lines that were on a proposed list of Chinese imports announced on July 10, 2018. Changes to the proposed list were made after USTR and the interagency Section 301 Committee sought and received comments over a six-week period and testimony during a six-day public hearing in August. USTR engaged in a thorough process to rigorously examine the comments and testimony and, as a result, determined to fully or partially remove 297 tariff lines from the original proposed list. Included among the products removed from the proposed list are certain consumer electronics products such as smart watches and Bluetooth devices; certain chemical inputs for manufactured goods, textiles and agriculture; certain health and safety products such as bicycle helmets, and child safety furniture such as car seats and playpens.

     

     

  • China Sets Tariffs on $16B in U.S. Goods

    Aug. 2018

    Source: Politico Pro Datapoint

    On Aug. 23, the U.S. and China each set tariffs on $16 billion of each other’s goods. China announced and imposed these tariffs after the U.S.  announced its own tariffs. This is the second time China has followed U.S. actions in setting tariffs.

    Texas, California and South Carolina led states by the total value of these goods that were exported to China in 2017. Washington, Illinois and Pennsylvania will see tariffs on more than $400 million in exports to China — and are facing key midterm races in November

    U.S. exports to China hit by Aug. 23 tariffs, by state Infographic 

  • Update Aug. 2018: USTR Finalizes Second Portion of Tariffs on Chinese Products

    USTR Finalizes Second Portion of Tariffs on Chinese Products

    Posted by the Office of the United States Trade Representative on 8/7/18

    The Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) today released a list of approximately $16 billion worth of imports from China that will be subject to a 25 percent additional tariff as part of the U.S. response to China’s unfair trade practices related to the forced transfer of American technology and intellectual property. This second portion of additional tariffs under Section 301 follows the first portion of tariffs on approximately $34 billion of imports from China, which went into effect on July 6.

    The list contains 279 of the original 284 tariff lines that were on a proposed list announced on June 15. Changes to the proposed list were made after USTR and the interagency Section 301 Committee sought and received written comments and testimony during a two-day public hearing last month. Customs and Border Protection will begin to collect the additional duties on the Chinese imports on August 23.

    In March 2018, USTR released the findings of its exhaustive Section 301 investigation that found China’s acts, policies and practices related to technology transfer, intellectual property and innovation are unreasonable and discriminatory and burden U.S. commerce.

    Specifically, the Section 301 investigation revealed:

    • China uses joint venture requirements, foreign investment restrictions, and administrative review and licensing processes to require or pressure technology transfer from U.S. companies.
    • China deprives U.S. companies of the ability to set market-based terms in licensing and other technology-related negotiations.
    • China directs and unfairly facilitates the systematic investment in, and acquisition of, U.S. companies and assets to generate large-scale technology transfer.
    • China conducts and supports cyber intrusions into U.S. commercial computer networks to gain unauthorized access to commercially valuable business information.
       

    A formal notice of the $16 billion tariff action will be published shortly in the Federal Register. NOTE: As in the case of the first portion of additional tariffs, the notice will announce a process by which interested persons may request the exclusion of particular products covered by a tariff line subject to the additional duties.

  • U.S Chamber of Commerce Resources

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce (USCC) is the world’s largest business organization representing the interests of more than 3 million businesses of all sizes, sectors, and regions. USCC members range from mom-and-pop shops and local chambers to leading industry associations and large corporations. 

    Trade Tariff Resources 

  • National Retail Federation Resources

    The National Retail Federation is the world’s largest retail trade association. Based in Washington, D.C., NRF represents discount and department stores, home goods and specialty stores, Main Street merchants, grocers, wholesalers, chain restaurants and internet retailers from the United States and more than 45 countries. 

    Trade Tariff Updates

     

     

     

  • Call To Action - NRF's Letter Template Tool

    Take 2 minutes to let your representatives know that you have concerns with the proposed tariffs on products, materials and component parts from China. 

    Link to Template Tool

  • Tracking Tariffs on U.S. Goods

    Tracking Tariffs on US Goods

    August 15, 2018.  By Taylor Miller Thomas, Politico Datapoint 

    Multiple countries have set tariffs on US goods in the fallout after president Donald Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs. China set the earliest tariffs, on April 2, in the midst of a series of trade threats exchanged with the U.S. Other countries set tariffs as they were affected by the US tariffs, including Canada, the EU, and Mexico, which announced tariffs on the US after the steel and aluminum tariffs went into effect on their exports on May 31.  All told, more than $70 million in US exports are affected by these retaliatory tariffs. View this infographic to learn more. 

  • Forms and Instructions for Submitting Requests for Product Exclusions

    Forms and Instructions for submitting requests for product exclusions:

    Source: www.ustr.gov 

  • Instructions for Submitting Public Comments

    Instructions for submitting Public Comments

    • Link here to display the Comment form.
    • Enter your comments, attach files (up to 10MB each), as well as your personal information when applicable. Complete all the required fields.
    • Tips for submitting effective comments
    • Please note that information entered on the web form may be viewable publicly. These fields are identified by the globe icon.
    • Once you reach the "Your Preview" screen, the information that will be viewable publicly is displayed directly on the form under the section titled: "This information will appear on Regulations.gov."
    • To complete your comment, you must first agree to the disclaimer and check the box. This will enable the "Submit Comment" button.
    • Upon completion, you will receive a Comment Tracking Number for your comment.

    Source: www.regulations.gov