Library - In Memoriam

Remembering oral history interviewees who have passed away.

Ndugu Chancler cut his teeth as a jazz drummer but later expanded his scope to include the blues, pop, soul, and funk.

David Van Koevering worked alongside Bob Moog in the early days of marketing the Minimoog synthesizer. The instrument was the first mass produced synthesizer that produce unique tones, ushering in a new era of electronic music.

Stan Kitchen, along with his late wife Shirley, were the co-owners and founders of Studio Music.

Ted Sambell was born in London, England and made his living as a piano technician in London, and Ontario, Canada.

Rick Hall was born just down the country road from Sam Philips, the founder of Sun Records in Memphis.  Perhaps there was something in the Florence River there near Muscle Shoals because Rick too went on to establish a famous recording studio, Fame!  Rick entered the music publis

Dee Vinton was known as Dancin’ Dee around the Museum of Making Music where she was a noted docent since the early 2000’s. Dee was fond of telling her tour groups that her mother was a dime-a-dance girl in the heyday of the 1920’s dance craze.

Curly Seckler was a pioneer in the development of Bluegrass music. He began performing professionally in 1935, on a daily radio program on WSTP in Salisbury, NC.  After the breakup of the Monroe Brothers act, Curly was the first tenor singer selected by Charlie Monroe for his Kentucky Pardners band in 1939. He was also the tenor singer with Flatt & Scruggs for twelve years, during their most creative period, and can be heard on nearly all of their greatest hits.

Dan Hall was the founder of Hall Piano Company, located on David Drive in Metairie, Louisiana.  The store was opened in 1958 just after Dan had moved from Beaumont, Texas, where he began his career as a piano retailer.  His interesting story in the music industry began by a chanc

Grassella Oliphant was a drummer is entire life and it is what he loved to do.  During his long career, he played back-up for a host of jazz and blues performers as well as singers such as Sarah Vaughan and Gloria Lynne. Beginning in the 1950s, Grassella’s long association with the drum industry began as an endorser of Ludwig and later with Rodgers.

Leon Rhodes was one of the most beloved country music guitarists in history. He established himself as a clever and hard driving musician as part of Ernest Tubb’s Texas Troubadours.

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